Notorious Graduates from Peru Print

For a summary of the most notorious graduates from Peru click here

PERU

Name: Telmo Hurtado
Country: Peru
Dates/courses: Attended Arms Orientation courses from 1981-1982 during the height of military repression
Info: Accused of perpetrating the August 14, 1985 massacre of 69 children, women and men in the village of Accomarca while they commanded four military brigades that carried out the executions.  Hurtado separated the children and women of the village from the men so that his unit could rape them, then ordered them into buildings which he set on fire, burning them alive. (Some info cited here: http://www.cja.org/article.php?list=type&type=80) Hurtado was sentenced to 6 years in prison for "abuse of authority." A U.S. State Department report released in February 1994 said that Hurtado was freed and returned to active duty, a testament to the impunity enjoyed by most of the Peruvian military. Americas Watch reports he has since been promoted to captain. (Americas Watch Report: Untold Terror: Violence Against Women in Peru’s Armed Conflict, 1992; Latinamerica Press, 1/24/94).  He was arrested by ICE in the United States in 2006 after fleeing Peru.

Name:
Vladimiro Lenin Montesinos Torres
Country: Peru
Dates/courses: Attended the Cadet course at the SOA in 1965
Info: Former Chief of Intelligence who allegedly ran the “Colina death squads” linked to the La Cantuta murders and disappearances.  (Americas Watch Report: Anatomy of a Cover-up: The Disappearances at La Canuta, 1993) Four officers tortured after plotting a coup against Fujimori in November 1992 state that Montesinos took an active part in torturing them. (Americas Watch Report: Human Rights in Peru: One Year After Fujimori’s Coup, 1993)  He was sentenced 15 years in prison for numerous corruption convictions, and then sentenced to six more years in prison for using government money to fund former President Fujimori’s 2000 campaign.

Luis Miguel Aparicio Manrique, 1971, Internal Security Operations CC-6
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Aparicio Manrique and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials. (Informe del Grupo
de Trabajo Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

GEN Ismael Araujo, 1962, Military Intelligence Officer
Lurigancho Prison Massacre, 1986: Accused of involvement in this prison massacre in which more than 120 people were killed, the majority of whom had already surrendered. (Americas Watch Report: Una Guerra Desesperada)

COL Eduardo Arbulu Gonzales, 1969, Cadet Orietation
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Arbulu Gonzales and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

COL Mario Arbulu Seminario, 1965, Cadet Orientation
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Arbulu Seminario and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

MAJ Teodoro Barrera Diaz, 1972, Internal Security Operations CC-6
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Barrera Diaz and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

COL Oscar Bernuy Alarcon, 1969, Cadet Orientation
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Bernuy Alarcon and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

LTC Carlos Delgado Medina, 1965, Cadet Orientation
Accomarca massacre, 1985: Planned the operation that resulted in the massacre of 69 civilians in Accomarcho. (Americas Watch Report: Human Rights in Peru After President Garcia’s First Year, 1986)

GEN Manuel Delgado Rojas, 1966, Parachute Rigger
Supports paramilitary groups, 1990: Gen. Delgado publicly praised the activities of a paramilitary groups that had forcibly occupied a village and assassinated local leaders. (Americas Watch Report: Una Guerra
Desesperada)

CPT Rafael Franco de la Cuba, 1980, Orientaci?n de Armas para Cadetes
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Franco de la Cuba and othermilitary officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo
de Trabajo Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

Maj Eliseo Gonzales Chavez, 1974, Basic Combat and Counterinsurgency
Drug-trafficking: Co-defendant in a 1994 case in which he was accused of drug-trafficking, money laundering, and corruption. (Expreso 5/25/94;El Comercial; Caretas 1428, 8/22/96)

CDR Manuel Guzm?n, 1976, Commando Operations
"La Cantuta" murders, 1992: Guzm?n carried out the kidnapping of nine university students and a professor, and delivered the prisoners to a Special Operations team commanded by MAJ Martin Rivas (below). (Americas Watch Report: Anatomy of a Cover-up: The Disappearances at La Canuta,
1993)

GEN Nicol?s de Bari Hermoza R?os, 1976, Command and General Staff
College
"La Cantuta" murders, 1992: As Commander of the Peruvian Army, Hermoza refused to let the Peruvian Congress question officers involved in the "La Cantuta" disappearance and murder of 9 university students and a professor. He also issued public threats against the commission investigating the case
and paraded tanks through the streets of Lima to back up his words.
Later, a top governmental security adviser claimed Hermoza was himself involved in the formation of the death squad that carried out the murders. (Americas Watch Report: Anatomy of a Cover-up: The Disappearances at La Canuta, 1993)

CPT Luis Landivar Gutierrez, 1980, Orientaci?n de Armas para Cadetes
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Landivar Gutierrez and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

CPT Hector Lazo, 1973, o-20
Obstruction of Justice, 1984: Cpt. Lazo was charged by the General Secretary of the Public Ministry with obstructing the investigation of mass graves in Huanta (Americas Watch Report: Abdicating Democratic Authority: Human Rights in Peru, 1984)

MAJ Santiago Martin Rivas, 1977, Cadet Orientation Course
"La Cantuta" murders, 1992: Sentenced to 20 years on February 22, 1994, for the 1992 kidnapping and murder of nine university students and a professor. Martin Rivas was in charge of "The Colina." a unit comprised of soldiers with murder or assault raps - in exchange for clearing their records, the soldiers performed clandestine, illegal operations such as disappearances and extrajudicial executions. (Americas Watch Report:
Anatomy of a Cover-up: The Disappearances at La Canuta, 1993; Nicaragua Solidarity Network of Greater New York Weekly News Update on the Americas, 2/27/94)

MAJ Jos? Mayor Vasquez, 1975, Cadet Bombat Arms and Combat
Summary execution of nine persons, 1993: In March 1993, a military patrol in La Libertad department forced nine prisoners into an abandoned mine. The mine was later blown up with dynamite. The army later informed that Maj. Mayor Vasquez had been detained for the crime.
(Americas Watch Report: The Human Rights Situation in Peru, 1993)

Juan Miranda Rocha, 1970 CC-1
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Miranda Rocha and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

MAJ (Ret) Luis Angel Morales Cespedes, 1976, Officer Cadet Course
He ordered his subordinates to murder a civilian and hide his
body. Subsequently sentenced to 15 years in prison. (Americas Watch Report: Untold Terror: Violence Against Women in Peru’s Armed Conflict, 1992)

GEN Wilfredo Mori, 1972 Internal Security Operations
Accomarca Massacre, 1985: Gen. Mori approved the operation that resulted in the massacre of 69 civilians in Accomarca. He was forced into early retirement as a result of this incident. (Americas Watch Report: Human Rights in Peru After President Garcia’s First Year, 1986)

MAJ Alejandro Mu?ante Salazar, 1976, B?sico de Orientaci?n para
Oficiales
Drug-trafficking: Co-defendant in a 1994 case in which he was accused of drug-trafficking, money laundering, and corruption. (Expreso 5/25/94; El Comercial; Caretas 1428, 8/22/96)

TCL Miguel Najar Acosta, 1974, Basic Combat and Counterinsurgency
Linked to drug trafficking: Sentenced to 12 years for permitting the illegal release of drug terrorist Walter Shupinahue as well as allowing the transportation of drugs on the Marginal Highway (Gesti?n, 2/27/96)

CPT Jorge Olivera Silva, 1980, Orientaci?n de Armas para Cadetes
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Olivera Silva and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

1LT Guillermo Paz Bustamante, 1982, Cadet Arms Orientation
Accomarca Massacre, 1985: On August 14, 1985, Paz Bustamente
participated in an army massacre of 69 campesinos (including six
children) in Accomarca, Ayacucho. Paz Bustamante was charged only with failing to report the deaths of two peasants during the massacre. The military chose not to convict him, however, on the grounds that he "lacked time. was tired and was experiencing a very tense situation."
(Americas Watch Report: Untold Terror: Violence Against Women in Peru’s Armed Conflict, 1992)

Victor Penas Sandoval, 1980, Orientaci?n de Armas para Cadetes
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended theinvestigation of accusations linking Penas Sandoval and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

MAJ Carlos Pichilingue Guevara, 1980, Cadet Orientation Course
"La Cantuta" murders, 1992 (convicted): Sentenced to 20 years on
February 22, 1994, for the 1992 kidnapping and murder of nine university students and a professor. Pichilingue, with Martin Rivas (above) was one of the leaders of the operation. (Americas Watch Report: Anatomy of a Cover-up: The Disappearances at La Canuta, 1993)

GEN Jorge Rabanal, 1964, Jungle Operations
Lurigancho Prison Massacre, 1986: Gen. Rabanal commanded an operation in which 120 prison inmates were executed. He was found guilty in a civilian court, though a military court later reversed the decision.(Americas Watch Report: Desperate Straights: Human Rights in Peru After a Decade of Democracy and Insurgency, 1990)

GEN Juan Rivero Lazo, 1963, Cadet Orientation Course
"La Cantuta" murders, 1992 (convicted): Former head of Peru's Army Directorate of Intelligence (DINTE), sentenced to five years in prison on February 22, 1994 for the 1992 kidnapping and murder of nine university students and a professor from the Enrique Guzm?n y Valle University in Lima (La Cantuta). (Nicaragua Solidarity Network of Greater New York Weekly News Update on the Americas, 2/27/94) He was the highest ranking of the five SOA graduates to be sentenced for the murders.

MAJ Ciro Sime Carranza, 1980, Orientaci?n de Armas para Cadetes
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the investigation of accusations linking Sime Carranza and other military officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

Victor Taboada Hoyos, 1976, B?sico de Orientaci?n para Oficiales
Accused of drug trafficking: A Congressional Working Group on Chemical
Substances, led by Congressman Julio Castro, recommended the
investigation of accusations linking Taboada Hoyos and other military
officials to drug trafficking. The accusations were made by members of
the press and by other military officials (Informe del Grupo de Trabajo
Sobre Insumos Quimicos del Congreso)

GEN Jos? Valdivia Duenas, 1962, Communications Officer
Cayara Massacre, 1988: On May 14, 1988, army soldiers under Valdivia
Duenas' command killed (with gunshot, bayonets, and farming tools)
between 28 and 31 male residents of the hamlet Cayara. Returning four
days later, the soldiers arrested many villagers, dozens of whom
disappeared (only 3 bodies were recovered). Duenas was subsequently
promoted. (Americas Watch Report: Peru Under Fires: Human Rights Since
the Return to Democracy, 1992)

GEN Juan Velasco Alvarado, 1945, GS Functions
Dictator, 1968-75: Achieved power by overthrowing elected civilian
government. (The Washington Post, 5/19/94)

CPT Oswaldo Zapata Corrales, 1983, Opera/Combate para Cadetes C-5
Drug-trafficking: Co-defendant in a 1994 case in which he was accused
of drug-trafficking, money laundering, and corruption. (Expreso 5/25/94;
El Comercial; Caretas 1428, 8/22/96)