Workshops & Forums

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – TUCSON, ARIZONA
Location: YWCA, 525 N Bonita Ave.

9:20 – 10:50

COPINH
“Justice for Berta Cáceres”
Over a year and a half after the assassination of visionary Indigenous leader Berta Caceres, the repression continues unabated and the US continues financing the repressive Honduran regime.  In this workshop we will hear from Gaspar Sanchez of COPINH about the quest for justice for Berta Caceres and COPINH’s ongoing struggle.  We will also discuss the role of the US and concrete actions we can take to call on Congress to cut US military and security aid to Honduras.
Courtyard

Colectivo Diversidad Sin Fronteras
“2017 Trans-Gay Migrant Caravan: The Struggle Continues”
Three migrant trans women from Central America and the organizer of Diversidad Sin Fronteras have a conversation and share stories of violence and resistance along migration routes throughout Central America, Mexico and the United States.
Conference Center

American Friends Service Committee
“Migrant’s Journeys from Central America to Washington, DC”
Militarization, xenophobic and exclusionary policies and institutionalized impunity have shifted the routes that migrants take through Mexico and the United States in recent years. The American Friends Service Committee and 67 Sueños, bringing our experience working on immigration across Mexico and the US, will use visual storytelling and share individual tales to demonstrate those shifts. In addition, we’ll discuss the policy changes that migrant advocates are pushing in both countries and equip participants to get involved.
Board Room

9:30 – 12:30

Just Seeds
“Block-printing Resistance”
In this three hour block-printing workshop explore designing a powerful and emotive image that speaks to these times, that invites new perspective and possibilities for change. You will learn how to use carving tools and their expressive potential, and then hand printing techniques that include finding the balance between pressure and inking. Printmaking has a rich history that is entwined with powerful social change both in Mexico and around the world. It can be reproduced and multiplied. We can use it as a medium to amplify our voices. Block printing in particular connects us to slow steady work with our hands, that is at once simple and holds infinite creative possibility. Let’s carve, share and talk about pushing the limits of all these possibilities
Global Justice Center

11:00 – 12:30

Coalición de Derechos Humanos, End Streamline Coalition, Mijente, Puente Arizona
“The Criminalization of Migration: Prosecution of “Illegal” Entries and Re-entries”
The prosecution of migrants for illegal entries and re-entries have increased dramatically across the nation.  Operation Streamline, a fast-track prosecution program started in December 2005 in Del Rio, Texas, and extended to the Tucson District Court in January 2008.  These prosecutions represent the vast majority of all the cases before the Tucson U.S District Court. Because of the fast nature of Operation Streamline, rights are violated and potential applicants for political asylum are convicted and sentenced without regard to their underlying claims of political persecution in their own countries.
Courtyard

Palestinian BDS National Committee, US Campaign for Palestinian Rights, Friends of Sabeel North America
“From Palestine to Mexico, All the Walls Have Got to Go: BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) and Border Militarization”
People have chanted “From Palestine to Mexico, All the Walls Have Got to Go” at anti-Trump mobilizations across the country. Trump has held up Israel’s walls, meant to further steal Palestinian land and hinder Palestinian freedom of movement as a model for expanding the US/Mexico border wall, something cheered on by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. This fall, immigrant rights and Indigenous activists from the US visited Palestine to witness what is happening on the ground and learn about Palestinian resistance to Israel’s walls. Come to this forum to discuss the linkages between these struggles against walls.
Conference Center

Witness for Peace – South West
“Black Liberation, Reparations and the Fight Against US Imperialism”
During this workshop, we will touch on the historical campaigns for reparations and the peoples using a Black liberation and reparations framework to carry out their work against US militarization, economic intervention and political manipulation. We will cover cases in Honduras, Haiti, Venezuela, Belize, Colombia and other movements that are working to build reparations into their movement work and the backlash they have received by the US and other colonial powers.
*POC Only Space*
Board Room

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 – NOGALES, ARIZONA
Location: Hotel Americana, 639 N Grand Ave.

12:30 – 2:00

COPINH
“Justice for Berta Cáceres”
Over a year and a half after the assassination of visionary Indigenous leader Berta Caceres, the repression continues unabated and the US continues financing the repressive Honduran regime.  In this workshop we will hear from Gaspar Sanchez of COPINH about the quest for justice for Berta Caceres and COPINH’s ongoing struggle.  We will also discuss the role of the US and concrete actions we can take to call on Congress to cut US military and security aid to Honduras.
Maya Room

CIVIC
“Abolishing the Immigration Detention System: Strategies & Stories”
This skills-sharing workshop will explore a diverse variety of tactics for exposing and abolishing the immigration detention system, including acts of resistance inside and outside facilities, community visitation and pen-pal programs, rapid response networks and hotlines, monitoring tools to report rights violations, storytelling and media communications, and urgent advocacy campaigns. While all workshop participants will be encouraged to share their visions of justice and solidarity and brainstorm opportunities for collaboration, the need to center the voices of directly impacted communities will be strongly emphasized. Challenges or “traps” for the abolitionist movement such as reformist measures and the expansion of alternative forms of detention will be addressed as well.
Olmec Room

Interfaith Movement for Human Integrity, National Sanctuary Movement
“Sanctuary & Faithful Responses in Today’s Immigration Context”
In this forum, we will share stories and experiences of immigrant and ally faith communities which are accompanying, advocating for pro-immigrant policies, creating networks of protection and providing housing hospitality as part of a commitment to Sanctuary. Groups will share how they are addressing different kinds of crises such as detention, deportation, new arrivals, asylum seekers and helping long term residents become faithful citizens and conscientious voters. We will also share an expanded framework of sanctuary that includes addressing racism and mass criminalization. We invite you to come and learn, and to also share the responses and practices from your community. Come hear inspiring stories and updates about the sanctuary movement and how it is growing and evolving.
Tent 1

National Immigrant Solidarity Network
“How to Achieve Multi-ethnic Organizing on Immigrant Rights/Anti-US Empire Building”
From Asian-American and Chinese activist perspectives, the challenge facing, and suggestions on seemingly Latino/a issue organized immigrant rights movements and Latin America solidarity movements.
Tent 2

2:15 – 3:45

Stop US Arms to Mexico
“Merida Initiative and Violence in Mexico”
The United States is sending more guns to Mexico than ever before. These are both legal exports to the military and police, and illegal trafficking used by organized crime – with whom many state forces collaborate. As a result of the US-sponsored drug war and gun trade, Mexico is suffering the highest level of homicides on record. This panel/workshop will show the film, “Where the Guns Go,” and discuss actions to stop the industry of killing.
Maya Room

Alliance for Global Justice, Witness Against Torture
“Prison Imperialism”
The United States is spreading its model of mass incarceration around the world. The US government has prison management programs in at least 33 different countries, mainly to majority non-white and “developing” nations including Mexico, Honduras and Colombia. Funding is provided as part of the “War on Drugs”. These classified, clandestine programs involve the construction of new prisons, prison guard training, and data management. Join us to learn how these programs are part of the infrastructure of US empire, and why the fight against mass incarceration is an international struggle.
Olmec Room

The Migrant Trail – Mennonite Central Committee
“Death by Design: Border Militarization, Migrant Deaths and The Migrant Trail Walk”
In the last two decades, thousands of migrants have died in the Sonoran Desert. The increased militarization of the border has funneled migrant crossings to the most dangerous areas of the Sonoran Desert and the deaths have continued.Today, the remains of hundreds of unidentified migrants rest at the Pima County Medical Examiner’s Office. Families continue to search for their missing. Come learn about the tragedy that the border wall and militarization of the border are causing, and how The Migrant Trail Walk continues to bring attention to this tragedy for the past 14 years.
Tent 1

CISPES, COPINH, Honduras Solidarity Network, SOA Watch, Witness For Peace
“The Alliance for “Prosperity”?: the Next US Interventionist Wave in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador”
Launched in November 2014 in response to the mass migration of youth from Central America to the US, the Alliance for Prosperity perpetuates US interests in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador in the name of security, good governance and economic growth. What can we learn from Central American communities in resistance?
Tent 2

4:00 – 5:30

Rosa Clemente, Dr. Maha Hilal, Dominique Diaddigo-Cash
“The War of Narrative & its Casualties”
Dominant narratives shape the realities of marginalized communities.  Many of these narratives exist to paint various communities in negative ways so as to justify institutional racism, xenophobia, Islamophobia and other forms of oppression.  In addition, society, modeling targeting by the government also plays a role in shaping and reinforcing demonizing and criminalizing narratives of different groups.  This workshop will examine many of the dominant narratives that exist to justify violence towards our communities and explore alternative narratives that speak to our truths while dismantling oppressive discourse.
Maya Room

Jesse Franzblau, John Lindsay-Poland, Todd Miller
“Exposing State Violence, Surveillance, and Repression Through Cross Border Research Collaboration”
This forum will present past research on Plan Mérida and the U.S. role in systematic state sponsored violence in Mexico, focusing on the transfer of surveillance technology used to target social leaders, journalists, and human rights defenders. The focus will discuss research tools and collaborative efforts that have been successful in the development and dissemination of articles and publications, as part of cross-border collaborative efforts to document and expose government and private actors that compose repressive structures of violence. It will present proposals on ways to deepen collaboration between researchers, journalist and activists across borders, to enhance the sharing of information needed to expose state violence, and contribute to advocacy campaigns aimed at combating abusive government polices, and ending racist & violent systems of oppression.
Olmec Room

Pablo Orozco-Castro
“Activism Through Music and Community Empowerment”
The Activism Through Music and Community Empowerment workshop will give a space for fans of sociopolitical music to discuss and build community around music and activism. We will delve into discourse around the difference between “pop” music and “sociopolitical” music. The workshop will provide practical knowledge on how to make meaningful impact on communities by using activism in music. The closing of the workshop will include an interactive group activity where participants will create and share their work.
Tent 1

Replace NAFTA Campaign/Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch, Austin Tan Cerca de la Frontera, Mary’s Pence
“Organizing and Educating for Cross Border Worker Rights and for Replacing NAFTA”
Learn from three organizations working on cross border worker and economic security. Mary’s Pence will host this conference and share briefly on their model used to create 7 women-owned community lending pools in Central America and Mexico. Public Citizen will share a campaign to replace NAFTA and ways you can be integral to this effort. Austin Tan Cerca de la Frontera will share their experience partnering across borders with maquiladora workers and women artisans. The strategies across these groups include organizing, educating and creating alternatives working on economic autonomy.
Tent 2

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 – NOGALES, SONORA
Locations: Escuela Primaria Abelardo L. Rodríguez & Museo de Arte de Nogales 120

12:30 – 2:00

H.I.J.O.S. Guatemala – México
“Transitional Justice: Face the Past to Justify Neoliberal Plundering of the Present?”
There are more Indigenous peoples imprisoned for defending their territory than military officers responsible for genocide and State terrorism.
Museo de Arte – 1st floor

Tohono O’odham Nation of Sonora, Mexico
“The O’odham in Mexico in the Face of Militarization of the Border”
O’odham leaders in Mexico describe how the militarization of the border violates their Indigenous rights and puts them at risk.
Museo de Arte – 2nd Floor

Nakai R. Flotte, Irving Mondragon – Colectivo Anawakas Sin Fronteras
“Transmigrating”
With maps, videos and narratives, we will address migratory flows that diverge and resist in the face of bureaucratic torture and organized crime, focusing on the borders of the Northern Triangle of Central America.
Escuela Abelardo

Veterans for Peace
“Deported Veterans”
Veterans, who served this country honorably, are being deported and families are being split down the middle. These Veterans were often promised a pathway to citizenship, but quickly found themselves deported for breaking even minor laws. It is time that the US stop deporting Veterans. It is time they be allowed to return to the US
Tent 1

Alianza Sierra Madre, AC (ASMAC) & Sonora River Yaqui
“Indigenous Protectors & Sovereignty”
Indigenous groups/nations have continually been targeted by governments and corporations that steal land, extract resources, and dump toxic waste. Resistance is brutally repressed by militarization to subdue and silence. The mass media collude, leaving the public ignorant about the consequences for societies whose identity is defined by ties to the land they defend. Their survival presents a threat to border structures, militaries, and extractive corporations, because these societies represent alternatives whose very existence challenges neo-colonial policies. What can we learn from the teachings of these three communities addressing us today on how they confront challenges to sovereignty?
Tent 2

2:15 – 3:45

Olmeca, Rebel Diaz, Just Seeds
“Art, Identity and Politics”
Explore the world of art through artist’s lens.  We will discuss identity, politics, art and their intersections. How do we use art to create social awareness?  Can art become more than an information tool? Join our panel of artists, activists, scholars as we discuss this very needed topic.
Museo de Arte – 1st floor

Stop The Wall (Palestine), Palestinian BDS National Committee
“Towards a World Without Walls! Combating the Violence of Border Walls and Militarization from Palestine to the US/Mexico and Beyond”

“The Stop the Wall Campaign’s aim to tear down the Wall is aligned with the Palestinian desire for liberation – for those of us inside and in exile, the young and old, those who have died, and those yet to be born.”
– Palestinian Stop the Wall campaign.

In this forum, Jamal Juma, General Coordinator of the Palestinian Stop the Wall Campaign and Pedro Charbel, Latin America Regional Coordinator of the Palestinian BDS National Committee (BNC) will discuss Israel’s apartheid wall in the West bank, Mexico/US border militarization and Trump’s threatened wall expansion and how we can work towards a world without walls and border militarization.
Museo de Arte – 2nd Floor

Coalición de Derechos Humanos, End Streamline Coalition, Mijente, Puente Human Rights Movement
“The Criminalization of Migration: Prosecution of “Illegal” Entries and Re-entries”
The prosecution of migrants for illegal entries and re-entries have increased dramatically across the nation.  Operation Streamline, a fast-track prosecution program started in December 2005 in Del Rio, Texas, and extended to the Tucson District Court in January 2008.  These prosecutions represent the vast majority of all the cases before the Tucson US District Court. Because of the fast nature of Operation Streamline, rights are violated and potential applicants for political asylum are convicted and sentenced without regard to their underlying claims of political persecution in their own countries.
Escuela Abelardo

John Gibler, SOA Watch
“State Violence and the Expansion of the US Border Regime”
The Border Southern Plan, an arm of the Merida Initiative, has been an important factor in the increment of State Violence in Mexico. Implemented in 2014, the Southern Border Plan was presented as an alternative to attend the massive arrival of unaccompanied minors and families from Central America to the US/Mexico Border. However, the consequences have been reflected in the increment of the criminalization of migrants and refugees and the militarization of local communities. Despite the US and Mexico governments have justified the increase in violence with the presence of organized crime groups, the humanitarian crisis is a consequence of the expansion of the US Border regime, the creation of a State of Exception, and the systematic reproduction of strategies that aim to dismantle the social fabric and disappear local resistances.
Tent 1

No More Deaths, People Helping People
“Disappeared: How US Border Enforcement Agencies are Fueling a Missing Persons Crisis and People Helping People in the Border Zone”
In this workshop, we will present on distinct and systemic practices by the US Border Patrol that contribute to the crisis of deaths and disappearances along the US-Mexico border. Our abuse documentation team and desert aid working group will co-present on how Border Patrol practices force migrants and refugees into remote, deadly terrain. Border crossers do not merely go missing, but are disappeared by the US border enforcement system. No More Deaths offers a direct aid, humanitarian response with the mission of ending death and suffering on the US-Mexico border. People Helping People in the Border Zone was formed five years ago by residents of the small town of Arivaca, Arizona, located 11 miles from the US/Mexico border will present on how they provide and promote humanitarian aid to migrants while struggling against the militarization policies which make such aid necessary. Volunteers will share their experiences of direct aid efforts, the establishment of the Arivaca Humanitarian Aid Office, the Border Patrol checkpoint monitoring campaign, and the recent arrival of right-wing militia in the community.
Tent 2

4:00 – 5:30

West Coast Radical Zine Collective
“Black Border Crossings”
Black immigrants and refugees find themselves alone at the intersection of anti-black racism and xenophobia. Research shows Black migrants are detained and deported at rates higher than their non-Black counterparts. The double marginalization of Black migrants leaves them vulnerable to state violence and without access to community support. From the United States, to Libya, to Italy, Black migrants face the brunt of capitalist, imperialist policies that leave them disenfranchised and dispossessed.
Museo de Arte – 1st Floor

Observatorio de Derechos Humanos de los Pueblos
“The struggle for Popular Power: from the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO) to the Peoples Human Rights Observatory”
APPO’s experience of resistance in 2006 put in perspective the struggle for Popular Power in southern Mexico and the necessary creation of ties with teachers, workers, indigenous and peasant sectors of the rest of the continent.
Museo de Arte – 2nd Floor

Border Patrol Victims Network
“Searching for Justice on the Border”
Several members of Border Patrol Victims Network whose relatives have been brutalized or killed by the Border Patrol will share their stories. Shena Gutierrez, Guadalupe Guereca and other relatives will talk about their experiences and their struggle to seek justice. Our goal is to resist border militarization, bring attention to and end the abuses and murders by Border Patrol agents and put an end to US intervention in the Americas.
Escuela Abelardo

Alliance for Global Justice, Pan Left Productions, Sembrando Paz, SOA Watch
“Colombia: Violence in a Time of Peace”
Since the beginning of Colombia’s peace process, SOA Watch and AfGJ have led or participated in several delegations of accompaniment and verification. We visited regions with the largest indigenous populations, most extreme poverty, most assassinations of activists, and most displacement of rural peoples, as well as five zones where former insurgents and political prisoners are being reintegrated into civil society. We also went to Cuba during peace talks to meet with negotiators. We will present our findings, including how the US is impeding accords ending the civil war, and what we can do to defend them.
Tent 1

Sierra Club
“Our Borderlands: The Impacts of Militarization on Youth, Indigenous Communities and the Environment”
Barriers have already been built along 654 miles of the México-US border, and the trucks, cameras, towers, aircraft and army of Border Patrol agents are exacting a heavy toll on the communities that call this place ‘home.’ Panelists will discuss the impacts of border militarization of urban areas, Indigenous lands and the natural environment.
Tent 2

5:45 – 6:45

Colectivo Semillas Jóvenes
“Conversation: Local perspective against the border walls and in favor of creating healthy and fair communities for all”
The youth from Colectivo Semillas Jóvenes invite you to join them in an informal conversation to share perspectives on border walls and ideas for inclusive, violence-free alternatives.
Border Wall