Workshops in Nogales, Arizona

All workshops in Nogales, Arizona will take place at Hotel Americana (639 N Grand Ave, Nogales, AZ 85621).

1:00pm – 2:10pm, Workshop Session 1

  1. Empire of Prisons: How the U.S. is spreading mass incarceration in Mexico
  2. Unequal Economies, “Free” Trade, Border Walls, Labor Migration, Policing, Remote Sensing and Mass Incarceration: The Israeli Connection
  3. “U.S./Mexico Border Human Rights Crisis: Death by Policy, Criminalization of Migration and U.S. Policies Fueling Migration”
  4. “The Refugees No One Is Talking About: Has US Policy Effectively Silenced Refugees?”
  5. “Labor and Economic Abuse Epidemic as a Result of Militarization and Trade Agreements”

2:25p – 3:35pm, Workshop Session 2

  1. From Palestine to the U.S./Mexico Border: Border Militarization Practices
  2. “How to Build a Grassroots, Volunteer-led Migrant Solidarity Project”
  3. “Arizona’s War of Attrition on Migrants and Brown People”
  4. “Justicia en la Frontera”
  5. “Empire Has No Boundaries: “ Exploring the Parallels of Labor and Immigration Struggles in the United States Among People of Color

3:50 – 5:00, Workshop Session 3

  1. “When the Border Crosses People: Tohono O’odham Resistance to Proposed Surveillance Towers and Militarization”
  2. “Guatemalan Women Healing Toward Justice: the case of Sepur Zarco”
  3. “Berta Cáceres Vive: Indigenous and Social Movement Struggles in Honduras in the Face of Repression and Militarization”
  4. “End the Proxy War on Migrants and Refugees: Strategies for Fighting US-pushed Border Militarization in Central America and Mexico”
  5. “Accompaniment in Nogales, Sonora: Responding to and Resisting Detention and Deportation”

5:15 – 6:25, Workshop Session 4

  1. “Justice for Frontline Communities: The Mission of the Green Party Platform”
  2. “Indigenous Community Police and Their Fight Against Corruption and Violence in Guerrero, Mexico”
  3. “Deported Veterans”
  4. “Border Communities Struggle Against Militarization”
  5. “White Allyship: Processing Accountability and Healing Together”

6:40 – 7:50, Workshop Session 5

  1. “What connects the Eloy Detention Center, Riker’s Island and Guantanamo Prison? (Hint: think racism and state violence.)”
  2. “How to Refuse to Pay for War: War Tax Resistance 101”
  3. “From the 1960s to Ayotzinapa: Forced Disappearance in Guerrero and U.S. Policy”

 


Workshop Session 1 – Saturday, October 8, 1pm – 2:10pm at the Hotel Americana (639 N Grand Ave, Nogales, AZ)

Empire of Prisons: How the U.S. is spreading mass incarceration in Mexico

The United States is exporting its model of mass incarceration to Mexico and at least 25 countries, including Mexico’s first private prison, Cefereso #11, in Hermosillo, Sonora. This “prison imperialism” is one of the basic components of the infrastructure of Empire. Along with police and border militarization, mass incarceration permits neoliberal economics to manage through force and intimidation the inevitable consequences of capitalism: widespread disruption and rising political dissent.

Presented by: Alliance for Global Justice

* Bilingual, Olmec Room


“Unequal Economies, “Free” Trade, Border Walls, Labor Migration, Policing, Remote Sensing and Mass Incarceration: The Israeli Connection”

The global economic system that promotes free trade specifically places barriers to the free movements of human beings between structurally unequal economies, of which the United States versus Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Colombia, as well as Israel versus Palestine are examples. Outside of war, the primary motivation for mass migration is economic, (i.e. labor migration) which confronts embedded racism, border walls, an increasingly militarized police apparatus, and expansive mass incarceration.
This workshop will be presented bilingually in English and Spanish by Sharat G. Lin, who writes on labor migration and the Middle East, and Silvia Brandon Pérez, who is an activist and writer on similar issues. Together they will explore the root causes of labor migration, and provide a whistleblower’s look at the connections of the Israeli military-industrial complex to the U.S. border control, Ferguson and the “war on drugs”.

Presented by: San José Peace and Justice Center, Ecumenical Peace Institute & South Alameda County Peace and Justice Coalition

*bilingual, Toltec Room


“U.S./Mexico Border Human Rights Crisis: Death by Policy, Criminalization of Migration and U.S. Policies Fueling Migration”

The current crisis along the U.S./Mexico border has roots in U.S. domestic and foreign laws and policies. This workshop will address the historical factors in the construction of immigration and border laws, more specifically those along the Arizona/Sonora border region. The unprecedented expenditures, before and after 9-11, and militaristic/incarceration strategies have also pushed for the mass criminalization of migrants for the “crime” of illegal entry and re-entry, with these “crimes” representing almost 50% of all federal criminal prosecutions in the past two years. While these brutal policies are implemented, the migration from Mexico, Central America, and other Latin American countries can be directly traced to the double-headed U.S. monster: Wall St. and the U.S. military. Now communities in all the affected countries suffer the consequences of neoliberal economic policies, while facing militaristic and deadly obstacles in the basic struggle for life and liberty. Community efforts to deal with these three areas of work will be discussed, with recommendations for further work and action for those wishing to participate.

Presented by: Coalición de Derechos Humanos, End Streamline Coalition, American Friends Service Committee and the National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights

* Bilingual, Maya Room


“The Refugees No One Is Talking About: Has US Policy Effectively Silenced Refugees?”

Refugees provide testimony on the struggles of migration to the United States.

Presented by: Stand With Refugees

*bilingual, Tent 1


“Labor and Economic Abuse Epidemic as a Result of Militarization and Trade Agreements”

We invite you to listen and share stories and strategies of resistance to visibilize systemic abuses as a result of the capitalist system.

Presented by: Fuerza del Valle, Labor Justice Committee

*bilingual, Tent 2


2:25 – 3:35

“From Palestine to the U.S./Mexico Border: Border Militarization Practices”

Israel is exporting some of the worst practices of border militarization, including Israeli company Elbit Systems building surveillance towers along this border, and former Israeli Defense Forces members training Border Patrol agents.

Todd Miller, Tucson author of Border Patrol Nation, has written on these topics, and will have fresh news to report after returning from a September trip to Israel-Palestine with Gabe Shivone, thanks to grants from the Sparkplug Foundation and the Peace Development Fund, through the Southern Arizona Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) Network.

For a taste of his previous work on this topic, see: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/01/us-mexico-border-gaza-israeli-tech-wall%20

Presented by: Jewish Voice for Peace – Tucson and Todd Miller

*bilingual, Olmec Room


“How to Build a Grassroots, Volunteer-led Migrant Solidarity Project”

Come learn about No More Deaths/No Más Muertes, a humanitarian aid group whose mission is to end the death and suffering of migrants on the U.S./Mexico border.

Presented by: No More Deaths/No Más Muertes

*Bilingual, Toltec Room


“Arizona’s War of Attrition on Migrants and Brown People”

The State of Arizona has been the epicenter of racism and anti-migrant policies in the United States. This Workshop will explore these attacks and illustrate the people’s struggle against it.

Presented by: Puente

*bilingual, Maya Room


“Justicia en la Frontera”

In 2015 the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed murder charges for the first time against a Border Patrol agent in the death of José Antonio Elena Rodrigues in Nogales, Sonora in 2012. At least six Mexicans have been killed on Mexican soil by Border Patrol agents. One U.S. appeals court ruled those killed in Mexico have no constitutional rights in U.S. courts, so families of these victims continue to fight for the right to sue the Border Patrol. Impunity charges against any of the agents involved in the brutal beating death of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas on the California border in 2010. Dozens of other egregious cases are crying out for justice.
The Border Patrol is the nation’s largest police force and DOJ needs to show leadership in addressing the national crisis of excessive use of force by law enforcement and hold Border Patrol agents accountable for their actions. The Border Patrol Victims Network invite you to join the struggle to bring justice to the border. We hope that after you attend this workshop you can be part of this work. We need people all over the country speaking up for what is happening at the border. We hope to be able to network with other organizations and people so that together we can put an end to this violence.

Presented by: Border Patrol Victims Network

*bilingual, Tent 1


“Empire Has No Boundaries: “ Exploring the Parallels of Labor and Immigration Struggles in the United States Among People of Color

This workshop explores the parallels of economic and social justice in the US. Drawing from the experiences of labor and immigrant rights movement organizers, we’ll learn about building collective power across communities of color.

Presented by: Jerry King – SOA Watch Labor Caucus, Neidi Domínguez –

*bilingual, Tent 2


3:50 – 5:00

“When the Border Crosses People: Tohono O’odham Resistance to Proposed Surveillance Towers and Militarization”

While Tohono O’odham (desert people) have lived in the current border lands since time immemorial, recognition of our existence is often undermined and the colonial policy of disregarding Tohono O’odham insight is the norm. The most current example of this are plans underway to construct fifteen Elbit System Integrated Fixed Towers (IFTs), a surveillance operation representing another facet of the ongoing militarization taking place on Tohono O’odham jewed (soil/earth/land). Come learn about the government entities and corporations with an Interest in Militarizing Tohono O’odham Land, global policies influencing local landscapes, the detrimental effects of militarization and Tohono O’odham Himdag (culture and way of life).

Presented by: Tohono O’odham Hemajkam Rights Network (TOHRN)

* Bilingual, Olmec Room


“Guatemalan Women Healing Toward Justice: the case of Sepur Zarco”

Indigenous community psychologist  Maudí Tzay will speak about her role in a coalition of Guatemalan feminist organizations in the strategic litigation of the historic case of Sepur Zarco – the first in the Americas in which sexual slavery was successfully tried as a crime against humanity in a domestic court. Tzay’s work has played a crucial role in bringing healing to movements for social justice in a variety of contexts, and her talk will provide participants an opportunity to explore the connections between healing, memory, and justice in our shared work toward collective liberation and a world without gendered violence.

Presented by: NISGUA (Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala)

*Bilingual, Toltec Room


“Berta Cáceres Vive: Indigenous and Social Movement Struggles in Honduras in the Face of Repression and Militarization”

On March 2, 2016, Berta Cáceres, the Coordinator of COPINH and a renowned Indigenous, environmental, and social movement leader in Honduras was assassinated in her home after years of death threats and persecution for her leadership opposing the Agua Zarca Dam and the repressive Honduran regime put in place by the 2009 military coup. COPINH continues Berta’s struggle for autonomy and the protection of their communities, land, rivers, and forests in the midst of the violent plundering of Honduras. They, as with activists throughout Honduras, ate attacked, persecuted and murdered for speaking out. Come hear from Marleny Reyes of COPINH, as well as discuss how to act in solidarity and demand justice, including by supporting the Berta Cáceres Human Rights in Honduras Act, which would cut US military aid to Honduras.

Presented by: COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras)

*bilingual, Maya Room


“End the Proxy War on Migrants and Refugees: Strategies for Fighting US-pushed Border Militarization in Central America and Mexico”

For decades, US policies have generated high levels of economic inequality and violence in Central America that are forcibly displacing hundreds of thousands of people. In the past two years, in the midst of a political environment charged with racism and xenophobia, the United States government has begun a dangerous new strategy to keep Central Americans from arriving at the US’s southern border: the US is making Mexico and now Central American countries stop migrants and refugees before they arrive. Mexico is now deporting more Central Americans than the United States, and the Mexican border has become so heavily militarized that migrants and refugees are being forced to seek out more dangerous routes. This model is now expanding to Central America as the United States requires Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras to stop migrant and refugee flows in exchange for “development” aid. Join CISPES to learn more about the impact this new Proxy War on Migrants and Refugees is having in the region and to discuss joint strategies for resistance.

Presented by: CISPES (Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador)

*bilingual, Tent 1


“Accompaniment in Nogales, Sonora: Responding to and Resisting Detention and Deportation”

The Kino Border Initiative receives recently deported individuals in their aid center in Nogales, Sonora – both people who have lived for years or even decades in the US and those who have just recently attempted to cross the border. As part of their humanitarian aid, the organization seeks to respond in a systemic way to the concerns that migrants express and the abuses that they have suffered in the detention and deportation Presented by: Kino Border Initiative

*bilingual, Tent 2


5:15 – 6:25

“Justice for Frontline Communities: The Mission of the Green Party Platform”

The Green Party has normally been thought of as a party of largely white, upper middle-class environmentalists, but it really is much more than that. While climate change still remains a particular preoccupation of the party, in recent years, much has been done to create a much more intersectional, anti-capitalist party that includes the faces and voices of frontline communities all over the country. Members of the Green Party of the United States will discuss the opportunity for building power that is presented to members of oppressed communities within the Green Party. Presenters will include Adrián Boutureira Sansberro, field director for the Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka campaign, and Andrea Mérida Cuéllar, one of the national co-chairs of the Green Party of the United States and the southwest regional coordinator for the Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka campaign. Also expected to co-present will be members of the Arizona Green Party.

Presented by: Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka Campaign

*bilingual, Olmec Room


“Indigenous Community Police and Their Fight Against Corruption and Violence in Guerrero, Mexico”

After leaving the U.S. to return to her village in Olinalá, Guerrero, Nestora Slagado took up the fight against the narcos. In 2012, she was elected by the indigenous community to serve as the leader of the Community Police. After cracking down on criminal groups and drug cartels embedded with police and politicians, she was arrested and imprisoned for more than 2 ½ years.
In this workshop, Nestora Salgado and Felicitas Martínez, Counselor for the Community Police, will share their harrowing stories in their fight for indigenous rights and self-determination for their impoverished communities. Their personal lives will be places in the broader context of U.S. domination over Latin America. Presented by: Coalición Latinoamericana por Ayotzinapa – Los Angeles

*bilingual, Toltec Room


“Deported Veterans”

Many veterans, perhaps as many as 40,000 have been deported after serving honorably in the US Military. These men and women, who were not US Citizens at the time they volunteered, were given the impression that their status as veteran, honorably discharged, would ensure a pathway to citizenship. Unfortunately, as many found out, if they committed a felony, however minor, that was not the case and they were immediately deported. This unjust policy needs to change. Anyone willing to put his or her life on the line for the US should be given the opportunity for a second change. They have certainly proven they are worthy of that.

Presented by: Veterans for Peace

*bilingual, Maya Room


“Border Communities Struggle Against Militarization”

Arizona border residents share their experiences of ever-increasing militarization and their responses to the suffering which results from it.  

Presented by: Community members from Arivaca, Douglas and Tohono O’odham Nation

*bilingual, Tent 1


“White Allyship: Processing Accountability and Healing Together”

This space will be a facilitated dialogue open to everyone but specifically meant for white folks to talk through the issues of being in solidarity with people of color most directly affected by the violence of militarism. The facilitator won’t have any answers, but will work to structure a brave space in which we will collectively address what it means to be white and show up accountably for people of color-led movements. We hope to hold each other accountable and lovingly.

Presented by: Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN), Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ)

*English, Tent 2


6:40 – 7:50

“What connects the Eloy Detention Center, Riker’s Island and Guantanamo Prison? (Hint: think racism and state violence.)”

Witness Against Torture will show how racism and Islamophobia are used to justify indefinite detention and human rights violations – including torture – in its military, civilian and immigration prisons.

Presented by: Witness Against Torture

*bilingual, Olmec Room


“How to Refuse to Pay for War: War Tax Resistance 101”

Learn more about war tax resistance by watching the 30-minute film, Death and Taxes (in English). Afterward, discussion and Q&A will deepen your understanding of how and why many peace activists refuse to pay taxes for war and militarism. The workshop facilitators, network members of the National War Tax Resistance Coordinating Committee, provide firsthand knowledge of how the withhold income taxes in civil resistance against the war machine responsible for most of the issues we are confronting at the US-Mexico border. (Free literature in English and Spanish available)

Presented by: National War Tax Resistance Coordinating Committee (NWTRCC)

*bilingual, Toltec Room


“From the 1960s to Ayotzinapa: Forced Disappearance in Guerrero and U.S. Policy”

In Guerrero, Mexico, the armed forces have disappeared activists since the ‘Dirty War’ of the 1960s and 1970s, to the disappearance of 43 students of the Raúl Burgos Normal School. Alejandro Ramos is a human rights attorney with the Morelos y Pavón Human Rights Center in Guerrero, Mexico on the front lines of defending Mexicans experiencing violence. Kathryn Johnson, Policy Impact Coordinator in Washington, DC of the American Friends Service Committee, will address how to change U.S. policies that arm the Mexican forces responsible for many of these attacks.

Presented by: American Friends Service Committee

*bilingual, Maya Room